LED upgrade cuts LMU's carbon emissions by 47%

LED upgrade cuts LMU's carbon emissions by 47%

Minimise Energy helps London university cut carbon emissions by 47%

Minimise Energy has installed new LED lights at London Metropolitan University’s Holloway Road campus, reducing the building’s lighting energy consumption costs by £55,000 a year and cutting annual carbon emissions by 225 tonnes.

The university’s ambitious sustainability programme has resulted in it being named the number one university in England for carbon reduction. The lighting upgrade is the latest part of this programme.

The programme required an eight-strong team from Minimise to replace outdated and inefficient T8 lamps and panels throughout the Victorian blocks which make up the Holloway Road Campus.

“The campus comprises a mix of classrooms, lecture theatres, offices, a gym, dance studios and ancillary spaces,” explained John Hatt, Contracts Director, Minimise Energy.

“Most of the buildings are more than 100 years old and have been subjected to an ongoing refurbishment programme. As a result, the lighting and control infrastructure is complex.”

The LED upgrade was completed during term time, with most work carried out between 7pm and 4am to keep student disruption to a minimum.

“The campus is a 24/7 environment. Meticulous planning and attention to health, safety and on-site security was essential at all times,” said John Hatt.

The LED lighting upgrade forms part of a wider sustainability programme completed by the university under The Mayor of London’s RE:FIT framework.

 

The lighting alone is saving us around £55,000 per annum on electricity costs and has reduced our carbon footprint by 225 tonnes of carbon

Rachel Ward, Sustainability Manager, London Metropolitan University

“The programme was developed to help the university meet the targets set out in its carbon management plan, enhance the student experience, and reduce energy costs,” said Rachel Ward, Sustainability Manager, London Metropolitan University.

The programme also included the installation of photovoltaics (the university’s first renewable energy), energy efficient fans and air conditioning controls. The lighting upgrade was the largest part of the programme.

“This combined approach has been incredibly important,” said Rachel Ward. “We were named as the number one university in England for carbon reduction and have cut carbon emissions by 47%, putting us on track to achieve our 2020 target of 50%.

“The lighting alone is saving us around £55,000 per annum on electricity costs and has reduced our carbon footprint by 225 tonnes of carbon. The lighting has also made an improvement to the feel of the university, making it a bright and welcoming space for students,” she said.

The university is now focusing on ongoing student energy efficiency education, and also plans to instigate further sustainability upgrades in 2017 when it consolidates its three campuses into one.